Who’s Who in the Office

This week, The Times reported under the headline “American psycho on the path to power“, a study by the University of Oxford assessing the extent to which characters  were psychopaths.  Allocating a score of up to 28 in each of 8 characteristics, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory determined that Republican Presidential Candidate, Donald Trump, is more psychopathic than Hitler, Napoleon and Nero.

I recall management training courses characterising certain people in the workplace, which I thought worth summarising here.  There have been many authoritative studies around work-personalities. This is not one of them, and it is intended to amuse.
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Quarterly tax returns – HMRC’s thirst for knowledge

… about us.

HMRC published its consultation papers on 15th August called “Making Tax Digital” along with a series of other matters. Originally it was called “Making Tax Easier”. I assume they omitted the words, “to Collect” in error.  The Telegraph focused on the draconian penalty regime proposed (The Telegraph, 16 August 2016).  The Times was most interested in the new proposed powers of HMRC to penalise advisers involved in tax avoidance.

These proposals go to the heart of the relationship between government and the people. HMRC seeks powers to require unpaid work from citizens and will find itself destroying the understanding that used to exist. The relationship appears to be broken, and it seems like time to rethink it.

For centuries, tax was understood as government taking a share and using it as it saw fit. Excess taxation toppled Kings. Now, the people, and sometimes the media, are complicit in creating the illusion that tax equates to charity.  Tax is necessary for society to work, but it is not inherently a benign thing.

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