M’aidez, May Day

Having no political affiliation provides me with the space to criticise everyone, and there is much to criticise in our politicians. It must be very difficult to try to behave in a principled manner, while being dependent on the popular vote. Doubtless that is the reason why principles are so often lacking in democracy (except the principle that someone else is always to blame). The assumption that underpins democracy is that the voters will, overall, behave in a principled and intelligent manner. We can see, perhaps, why life for a politician is complicated.

At the eve of a general election, it is interesting to ponder that the whole idea of democracy is that voters hear all the arguments and vote in their own best interest. The Invisible Hand which Adam Smith identified as underpinning capitalism should then act to give the best solution for the voters as a whole. Continue reading “M’aidez, May Day”

The George Giveth, the Phil Taketh Away

Houses of Parliament

“Anti-Entrepreneur” was the first thought that entered my head, as I wondered why the Chancellor seeks to direct his tax-hoover exclusively on those whose industry underpins the greatest wealth in the UK. Then the light-bulb shone: it is politically expedient, playing to the gallery of those who are jealous, while economically, it is safe to attack entrepreneurs because they don’t complain, and cannot go on strike; they just don’t have the time.

There really wasn’t much in the speech, and the detail will emerge as the economists and tax specialists wade through the government press releases.  Our own Ian Abrey will be releasing his more technical analysis shortly, but for most business people the budget involved two sections:

  • There was the bit by which entrepreneurs and small businesses were abused, and,
  • There was another bit by which the Treasury will work out how they can abuse them more.

Entrepreneurs are the low-hanging fruit – they are just too busy working 24 hours a day to complain.  Perhaps this explains the comment that 1% of the population pays 27% of the income tax, since it is clear where the votes lie. But it does not sound like that 1% are under-contributing to me.

Compared to previous Budgets, the Chancellor was witty, for sure, and did not spend the first half-hour congratulating himself. Maybe he had his reasons. Nor did he mention Brexit, peculiarly. Much of the budget revolved around wider government policy, such as education, and I had to smirk when he indicated that after the Polytechnics were sprinkled with holy water and turned into Universities some years ago now, the trend has now gone full circle, along with rebirth of Grammar Schools and Technical Colleges. When will politicians learn to leave education (and all the professions) alone? Those involved in education may be happy to see £216m being made available for 110 new free schools – though that is less than £2m per school.

The Chancellor wants to tackle tax avoidance. How better than to turn his cannon against VAT on roaming charges and moving fixed assets into stock – matters with which no-one will be familiar. He will continue his attack on those who enable tax avoidance, and we wait to hear exactly how he defines his terms. I recall being lectured by a professional body in 2006 that we could be negligent if we failed to offer tax avoidance schemes.  We never did, but it shows how inconsistent governments can be when faced with public opinion.

Apparently the self-employed get too good a deal. He deftly ignored the down-sides of being self-employed (no holiday pay, sick pay or job security). The previous Chancellor helped them by scrapping Class 2 NIC’s. Although the real blows will be released while we are all on holiday in the summer, the taster for now is that NIC’s for self-employed people are going up 2% over 2 years. In one brilliant blow, the Chancellor will upset millions of self-employed people, for a total tax take of £140m.

All UK companies were looking forward to seeing their corporation tax rates fall, and this will not change, it seems.  What will change is that small businesses (usually entrepreneurs), who saw last year the rate of tax on their dividends go up as the tax credit regime was abolished, will now suffer more tax on their dividends. Once again the tax take will be small and the upset caused will be enormous.

Making Tax Digital (“MTD”) is supposed to be tax neutral. How then did the Chancellor conclude that deferring the entry of businesses below the VAT threshold into the MTD regime by 12 months will cost the Exchequer £180m? Do I detect some flying pork pies?

Business rates are the big headlines at present, and a package of reliefs was offered for small businesses to do very little but make it look like government was addressing the situation, especially for everyone’s favourite local pub. As for larger businesses and how to address the virtual business economy: the government will think about it and take soundings.

Other things the government will think about are simplification of Research and Development claims and the burning issue of North Sea Oil Revenues (don’t they belong to Scotland?).

An Initial Conclusion

The achievements so far and the objectives are laudable: we have a fast growing economy with low unemployment and inflation forecast at around 2%. Yet our borrowing is £1.7 trillion. Because governments do not produce balance sheets, only income and expenditure accounts, it’s hard to see what assets are backing that up. However, the Government says it wants to build productivity and infrastructure, delivering fairness.

Yet the reality is that Government is increasing the burden of small and medium sized businesses, imposing higher effective taxes, massively increased administrative burdens through MTD and auto-enrolment, while effectively subsidising larger employers by supplementing salary costs with in-work benefits and credits, and thus distorting the unemployment figures.

Government’s words are all about developing the economy and encouraging growth, but its actions are more about restriction, control and red-tape, welcoming us back to the 1970’s.  How ironic that the squeeze on taxes and increased red-tape reminds me of the decade when we entered what is now called the EU.

There is a saving grace: at least the Chancellor did not do very much at all.

The Lunatics are on the Grass

 

“The lunatics are in my hall
“The papers hold their folded faces to the floor
“And every day, the paper-boy brings more” (Pink Floyd, Brain Damage)

More than forty years after Pink Floyd released “Dark Side of the Moon”, the lunacy continues and only the faces in the photos have changed.  Each day, I read the newspapers with increasing concern.  Is it old age?  Or am I right to be so stunned that I struggle to find the coherent thread that links the stories? And so I decided to explore that link.

Continue reading “The Lunatics are on the Grass”

Quarterly tax returns – HMRC’s thirst for knowledge

… about us.

HMRC published its consultation papers on 15th August called “Making Tax Digital” along with a series of other matters. Originally it was called “Making Tax Easier”. I assume they omitted the words, “to Collect” in error.  The Telegraph focused on the draconian penalty regime proposed (The Telegraph, 16 August 2016).  The Times was most interested in the new proposed powers of HMRC to penalise advisers involved in tax avoidance.

These proposals go to the heart of the relationship between government and the people. HMRC seeks powers to require unpaid work from citizens and will find itself destroying the understanding that used to exist. The relationship appears to be broken, and it seems like time to rethink it.

For centuries, tax was understood as government taking a share and using it as it saw fit. Excess taxation toppled Kings. Now, the people, and sometimes the media, are complicit in creating the illusion that tax equates to charity.  Tax is necessary for society to work, but it is not inherently a benign thing.

Continue reading “Quarterly tax returns – HMRC’s thirst for knowledge”

Someone Sent a Promised Land

In the press this week, was a report that the DVLA thinks that they have lost £200m in road tax revenues since introducing the new disc-free tax system.  It caught my eye because, about a year ago, the Chancellor announced how they will now do away with paper tax returns and replace them with an online tax account.  Many of us wondered at the time how the IT would work.

In the 1970’s (I know I don’t look old enough) I recall how we all thought computers would do away with almost all mundane work, and we would live lives of leisure, and only do the work that humans must do.  It was a Promised Land, delivered by second class post via Royal Mail (like most government mail), it seems.  Is Government trapped in a 1970’s time bubble, desperately doomed to failure, yet hoping to save costs by computerising our lives?  Or does government have a long term strategy?

Continue reading “Someone Sent a Promised Land”

Nothing to Hide, Anything to Fear?

Alcatraz.jpg

We often hear, “if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear”?  Were it true, we would not object to the idea that some gentleman from the secret service might listen as we whisper sweet nothings, joke with close friends in a politically incorrect manner, or discuss a private business deal?

Privacy and secrecy are very much a part of business. Confidentiality is fundamental in professional life. Businesses work hard to create contact lists, customer lists, know-how and techniques, and guards them jealously.  Sometimes a non-disclosure agreement is needed to enter into any discussions with companies.  So let us not pretend that transparency in business is widely accepted as beneficial.  It has long been established that there is a need for a balance between the right to privacy, and the public’s right to protection.

But on which side of this balance do the new People of Significant Control Regulations sit?

Continue reading “Nothing to Hide, Anything to Fear?”