MTD: Get Ready to Reveal All

Hillier Hopkins LLP is holding a series of seminars on Making Tax Digital. Our own Ruth Corkin and HMRC’s Heather Elliot will present short explanations and provide technical background, followed by questions and refreshments.  Demand has been high and although most places are now taken, if you would like to attend, please do put your name down on our waiting list.

Making Tax Digital (“MTD”) is the latest euphemism adopted by government for shifting the burden of tax collection onto the taxpayer. We have seen the terms “Customers” replace “Taxpayers”, “Officers” and “Case Workers” replace “Inspectors”, and of course “Self-Assessment” replacing “Assessment“. We have seen friendly “Tax doesn’t have to be taxing” adverts, and “Advice” emails adding to the spin. However, make no mistake, whatever your political allegiances, MTD is among the most intrusive government projects yet devised in modern Britain.

Continue reading “MTD: Get Ready to Reveal All”

Post-Budget 2017: A Few Comments

The highlights of today’s budget were neither high nor light, but the budget did effectively do what, politically, it should have done: as little as possible. It was merely sensible. The objectives: attract the youth, make a noise about housing, give money to the NHS. For an embattled government, Mr Hammond’s speech will be generally welcomed.

The Big Issue was in relation to housing and his amendments to Stamp Duty Land Tax (first-time buyer exemption for properties below £300,000 and the first £300,000 on properties priced up to £500,000) will attract younger voters, as will the extension of railcards up to the age of 30. Of course the fiscal impact is to focus ever more burden on those in their mid-years (31 to 65) who are expected to carry the entire weight of the economy on their shoulders. But this mid-range is not what the Chancellor sees as his target for favours.

Continue reading “Post-Budget 2017: A Few Comments”

Pre-Budget 2017: No Direction Home

Another Budget: another opportunity to criticise government. Inevitably some will pay more to, or get less from, government. The Press have predetermined that this is a “make or break” Budget for Mr Hammond who must try to fit a large square peg into an impossibly small, round hole. 

He has to meet the popular expectation of entitlement and an even stronger belief that someone else should pick up the tab. Yet, this same population has also set a course into unchartered waters known as Brexit. Continue reading “Pre-Budget 2017: No Direction Home”

The Lunatics are on the Grass

 

“The lunatics are in my hall
“The papers hold their folded faces to the floor
“And every day, the paper-boy brings more” (Pink Floyd, Brain Damage)

More than forty years after Pink Floyd released “Dark Side of the Moon”, the lunacy continues and only the faces in the photos have changed.  Each day, I read the newspapers with increasing concern.  Is it old age?  Or am I right to be so stunned that I struggle to find the coherent thread that links the stories? And so I decided to explore that link.

Continue reading “The Lunatics are on the Grass”

Who’s Who in the Office

This week, The Times reported under the headline “American psycho on the path to power“, a study by the University of Oxford assessing the extent to which characters  were psychopaths.  Allocating a score of up to 28 in each of 8 characteristics, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory determined that Republican Presidential Candidate, Donald Trump, is more psychopathic than Hitler, Napoleon and Nero.

I recall management training courses characterising certain people in the workplace, which I thought worth summarising here.  There have been many authoritative studies around work-personalities. This is not one of them, and it is intended to amuse.
Continue reading “Who’s Who in the Office”